Bee Pollen

Bee Pollen

  • Ancient Egypt is where our present-​day beekeeping sciences began. The Egyptians were among the first peoples on Earth to keep bees, as recorded in temple wall carvings, and in hieroglyphics on papyri scrolls. Symbols of the bee and beehive appear everywhere throughout Egypt. The symbols are found in jewelry, inscribed on temple walls and tombs, woven into fabrics, carved on the famous Rosetta Stone, and next to the signature of the pharaoh on official documents. Bees and bee products were featured in almost every ritual.
  • Honey products were also broadly used in Greco-​Roman civilization. In both the Iliad and Odyssey, Homer repeatedly refers to honey and pollen. The famous ancient Greek vegetarian Pythagoras enjoyed honey daily, as did his students. Honey and honey water featured prominently in the ancient Olympic games of Greece; they were used as food and beverage, and for body and skin care during the games. The famous Roman writer Pliny the Elder described a village in the Apennine Mountains near the River Po where the majority of people lived to over one hundred years old due to their consumption of honey and pollen
  • Consider the following facts about bee products: Honeybees visit about two million flowers to make one pound jar of honey.       A hive of bees flies 55,000 miles to make one jar of honey.       An average worker bee makes 1⁄12 of a tablespoon of honey in her life.       All worker bees are female.       Bees communicate to one another by dancing, which they can understand even in complete darkness.       A queen bee can lay up to 3,000 eggs in one day—at a rate of 5 or 6 a minute. That is equal to 175–200 eggs thousand annually.       One hive may hold up to 80,000 bees—one queen, a few hundred drones (males), and the rest female workers
  • One gallon of honey equals the combined bee flight distance of going to the moon and back.
  • Bees from the same hive visit about 225,000 flowers per day. One single bee typically flowers per day. One single bee typically visits between 50 and 1,000 flowers a day, but can visit up to several thousand.
  • The brain of a worker honeybee is about a cubic millimeter but has the densest neurological tissue of any animal.
  • A bee travels an average of 1,600 round trips in order to produce one ounce of honey; up to 6 miles per trip. To produce 2 pounds of honey, bees travel a distance equal to 4 times around the earth.
  • It takes one bee working eight hours a day for a month to gather 1 teaspoon of bee pollen pellets, which contain over 2.5 billion grains of flower pollen loaded with micronutrients, trace elements, minerals, and antioxidants.
  • Bees produce the only food that will never spoil. Edible honey has been found in Egyptian tombs.
  • It is important to be aware that the bees from which nonorganic and non-​wild honeys and pollens (especially if they are not raw) are collected are often inhumanely treated by corporate honeymakers. This includes feeding the bees high fructose corn syrup (rather than leaving them a portion of their own honey to consume), smoking out the hives, spraying toxic nicotine-​based pesticides on the plants/trees from which the bees gather pollen, and a variety of other unsustainable practices. It is important to support those beekeepers that interact with their bees kindly and lovingly by using organic (nonchemical) methods of beekeeping.

 

  • Bee pollen (fresh or dried): Bee pollen is essentially all of the mineral matter inside of flowers that the honeybees gather (they play around inside the flower to collect it) and bring back to the hive on their wings and legs. Pollen grains are microscopic in size and bees collect millions of these individual grains, connecting them with nectar into small pellets. Beekeepers collect the pollen from the bees by placing a mesh collection device at the entrance to the hive that the bees go through. This device gathers between 10 and 50 percent of the pollen that the bees are carrying into a tray below, leaving a sufficient amount for the hive’s needs.
  • Bee pollen is the most complete superfood found in nature. Containing vitamin B-9 and all twenty-​two essential amino acids, it is a delicious-​tasting, energy-​rich source of complete protein.
  • Bee pollen is an alkaline food considered by nutritionists to be one of the most complete foods found in nature.
  • Has potent aphrodisiac and fertility-​improving properties. Pollen can reduce prostate problems as it rejuvenates sexual organs due to its content of seminal substances. People who suffer from low blood pressure can be subject to deficiencies in sex glands. Pollen increases blood pressure in these types of individuals, especially when taken with kelp, and may increase hormone levels and sexual strength.
  • Bee pollen increases strength, endurance, energy, and speed. It provides a quicker recovery from exercise; returns heart rate to normal; and improves endurance for repeat exertion. Bee pollen increases muscle growth and definition.
  • The British Sports Council recorded increases in strength by as high as 40 to 50 percent in those taking bee pollen regularly. Even more astounding, the British Royal Society has reported height increases in adults who take pollen.
  • Antti Lananaki, coach of the Finnish track team that swept the Olympics in 1972, revealed, “Most of our athletes take pollen food supplements. Our studies show it significantly improves their performance. There have been no negative results since we have been supplying pollen to our athletes.”
  • The extraordinary presence of B vitamins in pollen builds up our stress-​defense shield, increases longevity, and assists in reversing aging and wrinkling.
  • More than forty research studies document the therapeutic efficacy and safety of bee pollen. Clinical tests show that orally ingested bee pollen particles are rapidly and easily absorbed since they pass directly from the stomach into the blood stream. Within two hours after ingestion, bee pollen is found in the blood, in cerebral spinal fluids, and in urine.
  • Pollen is a source of eighteen vitamins, including nearly all B vitamins (except B12) as well as C, D, and E; rutin (an enzyme catalyst par excellence); lecithin/choline; all the essential amino acids (twenty-​two amino acids in total); fourteen fatty acids including essential fatty acids; eleven carbohydrates ranging from polysaccharides to simple sugars; nucleic acids such as RNA, DNA; steroid hormone substances, a plant hormone similar to the human pituitary called gonadotropin; 15 percent lecithin, and we are still discovering more. According to research by doctors from France, Italy, and the USSR, pollen is one of the richest sources of bioavailable protein in nature. Pollen is approximately 25 percent protein.
  • Gram for gram, pollen contains an estimated five to seven times more protein than meat, eggs, or cheese. Because the protein in pollen is in a predigested form, it is much easier to assimilate.
  • “Long lives are attained by bee pollen users; it is one of the original treasure-​houses of nutrition and medicine. Each grain contains every important substance that is necessary to life.” —Dr. Naum Petrovich Joirich, chief scientist at the Soviet Academy in Vladivostok.
  • In 1945 a report from Russian biologist Nicholas Tsitin was published stating that of the one hundred and fifty Russian centenarians who replied to a questionnaire inquiring about their age, occupation, and principal foods, all replied that honey was their main food staple. Further investigation by the Longevity Institute of the USSR revealed that they ate not only honey, but bee pollen and other hive products as well. Honeybee pollen is the richest source of vitamins found in Nature in a single food.
  • Even if bee pollen had none of its other vital ingredients, its content of rutin alone would justify taking at least a teaspoon daily, if for no other reason than strengthening the capillaries. Pollen is extremely rich in rutin and may have the highest content of any source, plus it provides a high content of the nucleics RNA [ribonucleic acid] and DNA [deoxyribonucleic acid].
  • Define & research Rutin.
  • The overall mineral makeup of pollen is still open to scientific debate. Most researchers on the subject now agree that a fraction of pollen ranging from 1 to 3 percent of the dried mineral matter consists of unidentified compounds and mineral material.
  • Pollen contains up to eleven different major enzymes, including diatase, phosphatase, and transferase, as well as high amounts of catalase, amylase, and pectase (a pectin-​splitting enzyme), all of which aid in digestion. Just 130 milligrams of bee pollen can help assist in the digestion of three pounds of food, thanks to pollen’s enzymatic properties. Experiments show that those who take bee pollen decrease their daily intake of food by 15 to 20 percent.
  • When choosing pollen, choose either fresh pollen or look for pollen that has been dried at a hive’s natural temperature or less (not above 38° C or 96° F) by the use of dehumidifiers and air coolers in an airtight room. This way the pollen retains its complete nutritional value.
  • The best pollen has a variation of colored granules, ranging across the color spectrum.

 

http://www.mercola.com/article/diet/bee_pollen.htm

http://www.besmartstayhealthy.com/bee-pollen.html

http://www.appliedhealth.com/med-scope/bee-pollen.html

http://www.cfnmedicine.com/article/bee-pollen-extends-lifespan

http://www.thehoneybees.com/pollen.html

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