Lion’s Mane

Lion’s Mane

  • Contains NGF, along with chlorella, chaga, ashwagandha, and ashitaba
  • The lion’s mane mushroom, in particular, has drawn the attention of researchers for its notable nerve-regenerative properties.

 

Lion’s mane mushrooms are increasingly studied for their neuroprotective effects. Two novel classes of Nerve Growth Factors (NGFs) — molecules stimulating the differentiation and re-myelination of neurons — have been discovered in this mushroom so far

 

NGFs can be applied to the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease, but can also be used to improve cognition and mental performance.

 

Studies have shown that Ngf affects cholinergic neurons and acetylcholinelystyrase

 

In a study of 30 females over the age of 40 who have similar physical characteristics and lifestyle habits, the women who took lion’s mane everyday for 4 weeks saw a significant improvement with their menopausal symptoms, were less depressed and less anxious, and has fewer indefinite complaints (these are associated with symptoms such as cognitive dysfunction, thinning of hair, gallbladder, vaginal, lower back pain, irritation, anxiety, etc.)

 

Recently, mice were injected with neurotoxic peptides in an experiment to assess the effects of lion’s mane on the type of amyloid plaque formation seen in Alzheimer’s patients. The mice were then challenged in a standard “Y” maze, designed for testing memory. Mice fed with a normal diet were compared to those supplemented with lion’s mane mushrooms. As the peptide-induced plaque developed, the mice lost the ability to memorize the maze. When these memory-impaired mice were fed a diet containing 5 percent dried lion’s mane mushrooms for 23 days, the mice performed significantly better in the Y maze test. Interestingly, the mice regained another cognitive capacity, something comparable to curiosity, as measured by greater time spent exploring novel objects compared to familiar ones.

 

The reduction of beta amyloid plaques in the brains of mushroom-fed mice vs. the mice not fed any mushrooms was remarkable. The formation of amyloid plaques is what many researchers believe is a primary morphological biomarker associated with Alzheimer’s. Plaques linked to beta amyloid peptide inflame brain tissue, interfere with healthy neuron transmission, and are indicated in nerve degeneration.

 

The influence of lion’s mane influence on neurological functions may also have other added benefits — making you feel good. In another small clinical study (n=30), post-menopausal women who consumed lion’s mane baked into cookies vs. those without showed less anxiety and depression yet improved in their ability to concentrate (Nagano et al., 2010).

 

Lions mane has also been found to facilitate and accelerate functional recovery after peripheral nerve injury. Peripheral nerves may be subjected to crush injuries in a vari- ety of circumstances, including motor vehicle accidents, frac- tures, dislocations and natural disasters such as earthquakes.

These effects are due to the beta glucan polysaccharides, or complex
sugars, along with fatty acids and polypeptides. A study conducted by Shizoka University
Japan showed that Lion’s Mane stimulates Nerve Growth Factor. A lack
of Nerve Growth Factor is what contributes to such conditions as
Alzheimer’s Disease. Unfortunately, Nerve Growth Factor is something
that diminishes and it can be difficult to replenish because it is too
large and significant to pass through the membrane that protects it.
The study conducted at Shizoka showed that Lion’s Mane can replenish
Nerve Growth Factor, therefore reducing the effects that dementia can
have on a person’s life. This significantly improves the quality of
life.

Scientific research has shown that there are no known side effects,
which may have something to do with the fact that Lion’s Mane is
completely natural and edible. Throughout recorded history, there have
not been any side effects recorded. If there have been any, they have
not been significant enough to mention.

 

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